Upcoming Events


Click Image To Enlarge
Sunday 25 September
White Oak Music Hall Upstairs 07:00 PM All Ages $12.00 ADV $13.00 DAY OF BOX OFFICE
Xenia Rubinos, Mind Shrine
Vocalist and composer Xenia Rubinos crafts movingly powerful songs dipping in and out of genre and structure to create a sound that is fearlessly her own. Xenia's powerhouse vocals are at the center of her music which grows from a wide range of influences from R&B to Hip-Hop to Caribbean rhythms and jazz all delivered with a soulful punk aura. Her debut album Magic Trix was released in 2013 by Ba Da Bing! Records to wide critical acclaim. Pitchfork lauded the radiant singer as "a unique new pop personality" while a profile in The New Yorker described her work as "rhythmically fierce, vocally generous music that slips through the net of any known genre". Xenia's energetic live show and presence echoes some of the larger than life iconic singers she admired as a child including Judy Garland, Nina Simone and La Lupe while her powerhouse vocals recall the pop sensibility of Mariah Carey and soulfulness of Erykah Badu. Touring the US and Europe extensively, she has played more than 150 shows both as a headliner and supporting act for such diverse bands as Man Man, Battles, Coco Rosie, and Deerhoof. Xenia has been hard at work on her followup full length LP due out Spring 2016.

Click Image To Enlarge
Monday 26 September
Raven Tower Pavilion 06:00 PM All Ages FREE There will be a $5 cover for minors. RSVP does not guarantee entry. Admission is subject to venue capacity at time of arrival.
Swimming With Bears, Nava
We are a soulful alternative rock band from Austin, Tx. We met by random chance and have been playing music together for 4 years now. Our inspirations include Kings Of Leon, Temper Trap, Explosions In The Sky, This Will Destroy You, Phoenix, The XX, The Naked and the Famous, Two Door Cinema Club, and many more.

Click Image To Enlarge
Monday 26 September
White Oak Music Hall Downstairs 07:00 PM All Ages $18.00 ADV   $20.00 DAY OF $22.00 DAY OF BOX OFFICE
Okkervil River, Landlady
Okkervil River formed in 1998, a band made up of singer and songwriter Will Sheff, drummer Seth Warren, and bassist Zachary Thomas. They gigged around Austin, TX for a while and self-released a debut EP before finally attracting the attention of a small Indiana label called Jagjaguwar, who released their debut LP Don't Fall in Love with Everyone You See and its follow up Down the River of Golden Dreams. Critics took note of Sheff's creative drive and his dense, novelistic lyrics; Kelefa Sanneh wrote in the New York Times that "Mr. Sheff uses a rickety voice to disguise wild ambition," and Rolling Stone's David Fricke added that "Singer-songwriter Will Sheff of the haunted-country quartet Okkervil River is ready for worldwide renown."

But worldwide renown eluded Okkervil River, and by 2004 they were running out of money and worn out by a relentless touring schedule. Drummer Seth Warren had moved to California, and bassist Thomas was transitioning out of the band to spend more time with his family. Sheff decided that if the next Okkervil River record didn't find an audience he'd quit playing music. He returned from the road and rented a shack out by the Austin Airport, and the new lineup of Okkervil River - now augmented by drummer Travis Nelsen and bassist and multi-instrumentalist Howard Draper - would rehearse there by day and Sheff would sleep on the floor by night. The material they were working up was dark and sometimes disturbing, with a deep romantic undercurrent; it was inspired by a turbulent relationship Sheff was going through at the time, by the political climate of the mid-2000s, and by the life story of influential folksinger Tim Hardin, who died of a heroin overdose in 1980. Sheff decided he'd name the album after Hardin's tune "Black Sheep Boy."

On Black Sheep Boy, Sheff unpacked Hardin's two-minute recording into an expansive song cycle, woven through with themes of violence, abuse, oblivion, and longing, with periodic appearances by the title character, depicted on the iconic cover (by longtime Okkervil River illustrator William Schaff) as a grotesque horned creature with burning fire for eyes. Recorded in the dim, rickety garage studio of producer Brian Beattie, Black Sheep Boy overlaid raw electric rock, off-kilter pop, and sprawling balladry with a melodic and lyrical sensibility drawn from old American folk music. It blended acoustic textures like pump organ and mandolin with analog synths and manipulated electronic soundscapes mailed to Sheff by Seth Warren from his apartment in Berkeley, California. It sounded rough and handmade, raw and emotional, and unlike any record of its time.

Released by Jagjaguwar in early 2005, Black Sheep Boy is now regarded as Okkervil River's breakthrough album. NY Times raved, "[Sheff] writes like a novelist. His songs are full of elegant phrases and unexpected images." Pitchfork named it one of the "Greatest Albums Of The Decade" and The Guardian declared it "a work of riveting ambition." Packed tours and festival dates followed, and the album's first single "For Real" found its way into the ears of Sheff's idol Lou Reed, who named Okkervil River one of his favorite contemporary bands, asked them to open for him and told Sheff, "You have a classic rock and roll voice."

On a break from touring, Sheff and a now completely reformulated Okkervil River recorded Black Sheep Boy Appendix, an EP that combined re-tooled outtakes from the original sessions with new material to create a seamless whole piece, a new take on the Black Sheep Boy saga.

In celebration of the ten-year anniversary of this iconic album, Jagjaguwar is proud to present the Black Sheep Boy Anniversary Edition, a three-LP set combining the classic Black Sheep Boy album and its counterpart the Black Sheep Boy Appendix with an all new unreleased album entitled There Swims a Swan: full-band recordings made six months prior to the release of Black Sheep Boy which illuminate the album's roots in the traditional American songbook. Featuring beautiful, emotional readings of songs popularized by such artists as Washington Phillips, Lead Belly, the Louvin Brothers, and Roscoe Holcomb, There Swims a Swan takes the listener on a trip through the songs that inspired Sheff while composing Black Sheep Boy and reads like a run-through of that album's themes. Black Sheep Boy is celebrated for its album artwork as well as its music, and the Anniversary Edition collects that artwork in a meticulously reworked package, combining every previous element of William Schaff's imagery with a large new piece by Schaff depicting an updated Black Sheep Boy. The release also includes lengthy liner notes by Will Sheff walking the listener through the circumstances surrounding the album.

For Okkervil River fans (the most high-profile of whom was recently revealed to be President Barack Obama, who included "Down Down the Deep River" on his 2015 summer playlist), the Anniversary Edition is a loving, comprehensive, richly expanded presentation of a record many consider to be one of the band's best. For those new to the band, this might be the best place to start, the first step on a long road, the opening to a forest you can get lost in.

Click Image To Enlarge
Monday 26 September
White Oak Music Hall Upstairs 07:00 PM All Ages $13.00 ADV   $15.00 DAY OF $17.00 DAY OF BOX OFFICE
Bibi Bourelly, PJ
Bibi Bourelly will change the way you think about fearlessness. The 21-year-old singer and songwriter introduced the world to her remarkable sound and undeniable spirit with her first two singles, "Ego" and "Riot," which Fader called "brilliantly raw," and she's gearing up to do even more. Her sound is a balancing act of tough, wise worldliness and vulnerability that makes her a true force to be reckoned with. Bourelly was born in Berlin, to a guitar-player father and an art world powerhouse mother. Creativity, and most importantly music, were literally in her blood. Bourelly says of her musical upbringing, "You know the way babies pick up on words? I learned music like another language, because it was all around me." Technical skill and knowledge is only one element of what it takes to be an artist, though, and Bourelly says that her sound would be nothing like it is today were it not for the death of her mother from cancer when Bourelly was just six years old. Her mother's death, and the forced self-reliance she had to learn after it, is the foundation of her songwriting. In addition to introducing her to the experience of profound loss and pain at a very young age, her mother's death taught Bourelly to live life as freely as possible and to not take her desires for granted. In the years that followed her mother's death, Bourelly took to the streets of Berlin, hanging out on rooftops and subways, ultimately getting into trouble with her friends. This became the backdrop for her creative evolution, which eventually led her to write Rihanna's "Bitch Better Have My Money." While most young teenagers would have been in school, Bourelly was learning to see the world in a whole new way on the streets. "The world was so big when I stopped giving a fuck about what people thought," she says, adding, "when I was hanging out on rooftops, and drinkin' and shit, I could accomplish anything. I could be anything I wanted to be." After her grades dropped to a point she couldn't continue schooling in Berlin, she took everything she'd learned with her to the States. "I got to see the world from a rat's perspective, from a little person's perspective," she says of the days when people looked at her like "a troubled kid." She also took with her a feeling of freedom, of "running around the streets with my friends, and getting in trouble, and being scared of being arrested and shit." You can hear this freedom in her songs, and their self-possessed, wild child attitude. "They want me to be this picture perfect girl," Bourelly sings on "Ego," "But I curse when I talk and I lean when I walk and I been through some shit and I've gained and I've lost." It's this push and pull of freedom and sadness, self-possession with just a hint of heartbreak, that makes Bourelly's toughness truly unique. Her voice is soulful-powerful but rough, a little frayed around the edges like the morning after a long night. She's sweeter on "Riot," the edges a little cleaner, but the message is still one of strength. "If I go, I'm gon' start a riot, I'm fighting for my life here, I'm gonna give y'all everything tonight" she sings. This is the vulnerability that Bourelly is trying so hard to express, the struggle that still comes from being free. But it's that struggle that's so essential to everything Bibi Bourelly stands for. "I'm not saying I never get scared," she says, "but I'm saying I don't give a fuck if I'm scared." It's all part of the journey, creative and otherwise, and for Bourelly, that journey is only just beginning.

Click Image To Enlarge
Tuesday 27 September
White Oak Music Hall Upstairs 07:00 PM All Ages $10.00 ADV   $12.00 DAY OF $13.00 DAY OF BOX OFFICE
Days Of Yesteryear North American Tour 2016: Mystic Braves Plus Very Special Guest The Dream Ride, Ganesha
Mystic Braves sold out their first time show at the Troubadour, West Hollywood, June 13, 2015
"Bust out the wavy gravy and let the psychedelia flow. The sold out crowd, unplugged and tuned into the Mystic Braves who are the grooviest boys you can imagine, came back to LA to close out their tour. Sporting the authentic style of the 60s and perfectly matching hair, the band infused a new edge to their style of retro music and the fans caught every chance to ride a wave. The flower power on their album Desert Island kept the kids up well past midnight and inspired moshing on every jam."

"The scene at the Troubadour was indeed a dream-like, mind-bending, mind-altering, mind-expanding, mind-blowing musical trip."

LA Record
June 16, 2015

Click Image To Enlarge
Wednesday 28 September
White Oak Music Hall Downstairs 07:00 PM All Ages $15.00 ADV   $18.00 DAY OF $20.00 DAY OF BOX OFFICE
TroyBoi: The Mantra Tour, Hiram, Josiah Gabriel
One of South East London's most closely guarded secrets has recently emerged from the shadows and is set to take the music industry by storm. Known only as TroyBoi, this multi-talented musician recently signed to Timbaland's right-hand man and US Super Producer, Jim Beanz, things are heating up faster than ever! Producing a wide variety of genres, but specializing in extraordinarily unique, versatile, and highly musical trap beats, TroyBoi is without a doubt one of the top up-and-coming producers in the game right now and it's quite clear from his composition that his influences are vast indeed. He is also one half of the Producer/DJ duo SoundSnobz with one of his best friends, icekream and together they craft the most creative and daring audio paintings you'll ever listen to. Buckle up and get ready to be taken into the world of TroyBoi because once you are in, you will never want to get out.

Click Image To Enlarge
Thursday 29 September
White Oak Music Hall Downstairs 07:00 PM All Ages $35.50 to $46.50 ADV 35.50 to 46.50 DAY OF BOX OFFICE
Andrew Bird, Sinkane
With his new album, Are You Serious, Andrew Bird has widened the breadth of his art by directly rejecting his own human experience. With key contributions from Fiona Apple and Blake Mills, Are You Serious attains a level of expression that's a personal, evolutionary leap. "Here I am with my most unguarded, direct, relatable album to date," Bird says, "Go easy on me."

"I set out to make a record that's diferent than any I've made before," he explains. "I wanted to make an album musically crafed like a Wrecking Crew session, where you have to be good. There's less wordplay and more intention to process some brutal times that I went through. What happens when real ordeals befall someone who has always been happy writing from their imagination and the distance of the third person? Who has time for poetics while grappling with birth and death? What's the role of sincerity for a songwriter who doesn't really go in for the confessional thing? This is what I struggled with for this record. I suppose the title could be poking fun at my own foray into the confessional realm."

Are You Serious is the second record Bird has made with producer Tony Berg, following 2005's breakthroughThe Mysterious Production of Eggs. "Tony and I spent months preparing for Sound City," says Bird, referring to the legendary Los Angeles studio where Nirvana recorded Nevermind and Neil Young made After The Gold Rush. "We went through every part of every song, every note, scrutinizing the voicing of the chords, fnding melodically interesting ways to move from one chord to the next. I decided to work with a producer because I wanted the recording process to be more rigorous. Novelists have editors and playwrights workshop their drama. Tony really played that role for me on this album."

An up-tempo blitz addressing personal chemistry as a rearrangement of molecules, "Roma Fade" may be the album's centerpiece. Its sense of longing - "from the tips of your fngers, every strand of hair …you may not know me but you feel my stare" - is based in part on how Bird met his wife, or rather, the times he saw her before they met. "It always seemed to be at a party, from ffeen or twenty feet away," he explains. "‘Roma Fade' and ‘Truth Lies Low' present both sides of the phenomenon of observing and being observed. Desire draws a fne line between what's romantic and what's creepy."

The album's surprise revelation is "Lef Handed Kisses," a duet with the singular Fiona Apple. With Bird playing the skeptic and Apple the romantic, the stop-start ballad portrays two lovers who are philosophically opposed but inevitably drawn together. It feels like it could be a lost Johnny Cash/June Carter classic.

"The song began as an internal dialogue," Bird says. "At frst it was just my voice. Then this other voice came creeping in and I thought ‘this should be a duet if I can fnd the right person.' I needed to find someone really indicting. And Fiona does the pissed of thing really well! She was totally committed. The session was a long whiskey-fueled night. We were unhinged, for sure. All worth it, of course… I can't write simple love songs. People are complex. My inclination was to write a song about why I can't write a simple love song."

"My favorite songs I write are the ones that change and adapt according to my mood," says Bird. Album opener "Capsized" is a prime example, having been in his live repertoire for close to a decade under various titles and guises. In the album's recorded incarnation, "Capsized" is a propulsive gem evoking both the chamber-soul of Bill Withers and the backbeat of The Meters. Bird's vocals are driven onward by drummer Ted Poor and bassist Alan Hampton. The musically expansive nature of Are You Serious is due in part to ace ensemble players like Poor and Hampton, and the guitar playing of Blake Mills. "Blake raises the bar and gets where I'm coming from like few musicians I've met. He's as restless as I am and gets the odd accents and microtonal stuf that's outside western music."

The album closer "Valleys of the Young" encapsulates the album's themes. This is what Andrew means of when he uses the word "brutal." "For years now, the code I've been trying to crack is how to translate plainspoken real life into song and have it meet my melodic, syntactic standards. There are no riddles here. No encryption. I've lef the valley of the young, the small-seeming dramas, the brunch and misery, for a far more perilous place where your heart breaks from cradle to grave. The musical setting for this had to ensure that both young and old listeners can relate. Tony kept making us look at photos of the dust bowl storms raging across the prairie, the ones that made Woody Guthrie sing ‘So long it's been good to know ya.'"

Jettisoning established methods begets reinvention. This is part of the great success of Are You Serious. See how it plays out in person on Bird's 17-date Spring 2016 tour, kicking of March 30 at The Ryman in Nashville. "I never walk onstage knowing what I'm doing," says the artist. "It's a shrug-of-the-shoulders approach and people like it, it seems human to them. I began playing with the idea of reinvention, so that onstage a wild untamed thing can happen. I wanted to make a record that lets me subvert or expand my onstage personality."A personality now ready to answer the question, Are You Serious.

Click Image To Enlarge
Thursday 29 September
White Oak Music Hall Upstairs 08:00 PM All Ages $13.00 ADV   $15.00 DAY OF $17.00 DAY OF BOX OFFICE
Tourist, Wrestlers
A person who is always travelling or visiting a place for pleasure. That's how William Phillips' name defines his adventures as a musician. "It allows me to write whatever I want. My writing takes me to lots of places: electronica, garage, piano. I want to write anything, and the name Tourist lets me do that." And it's through channeling that freedom that he became one of Hype Machine's most blogged about acts, solidified as a young producer who crafts his beats like kinetic sculptures. Now, as 2016 begins, he's a Grammy winning songwriter on the verge of releasing his debut album.

Last year's Patterns EP, on Disclosure's Method label, certainly marked some changes in the Tourist sound. He brought in vocalists, in the shape of Lianne La Havas and Will Heard, and suddenly the dancefloor found itself right in his cross hairs. ‘Together' - an emotive deep house track with pitch-shifted vocals and whispers of electro - paid testament to this beefier approach, but it was the stripped back club-pop of ‘Can't Keep Up' that struck a key with his growing fan base, becoming a highlight during live shows at Pitchfork Paris and the Annie Mac Presents UK tour, and amassing over 3.2 million plays on Soundcloud.

Deep house and club-pop aside, behind this polished and digitally produced sound, still lurks a very pure musical soul, that boy who played the piano. This comes through on tracks like ‘Illuminate', which stole the Guardian Guide's ‘Track of the Week' and ending up on Radio 1's B-list, with its glittering and spiralled synth hooks embossed by the vocals of Years & Years Olly Alexander. Annie Mac summed it up pretty concisely when she said ‘Illuminate' just sounded "absolutely massive on the radio."

But it's the Tourist project that will be his entire focus this year, as he's poised to release his debut album U on May 6th 2016. First single ‘To Have You Back' premiered on Annie Mac's Radio 1 show and online via Pitchfork, and his next single ‘Run' is due on March 11th with ‘Too Late' to follow.

With a live show already locked in and a May UK tour in the diary, and with festivals including Coachella, Glastonbury and Sonar all under his belt, this is the year Tourist picks up the baton of that deep London electronic pop sound and takes it off the scale.

Click Image To Enlarge
Friday 30 September
White Oak Music Hall Upstairs 07:00 PM All Ages $15.00
30footFALL, Bigwig, Pears, Talksickbrats
Rising out of the scattered Texas punk scene, and surviving a string of early lineup changes, 30footFall quickly established itself as a notable and enduring band. Catching the attention and admiration of their peers, the band toured with punk luminaries such as Tilt, The Vandals, The Offspring, and Face To Face, and has appeared on countless compilations. The third of four LPs, 1999's Nitro release Ever Revolving, Never Evolving, highlights 30footFall's deft balance of roots punk styling and progressive themes. Going only by their first names, current members Butch, Brian, Chris, Jason, and Rubio continue to tour and deliver blistering punk rock to fans everywhere.

Click Image To Enlarge
Friday 30 September
Eastdown Warehouse 07:00 PM All Ages $15.00 ADV   $17.00 DAY OF $19.00 DAY OF BOX OFFICE
The Casualties, Slapshot, Lower Class Brats, Flatfoot 56, The Potato Pirates, Thug Boots, Johnny Rioux and the 713
The Casualties formed in 1990 out of a desire to return to the heyday of punk, an era that hung on into the early '80s and then started to fall by the wayside in favor of the very early grunge movement, as well as hair metal, synth pop, and new wave. But the band's lineup was far from stable in the early days. The initial lineup consisted of singers Jorge Herrera and Colin, drummer Yureesh, guitarist Hank, and bassist Mark. Even this inaugural lineup was shaky, with Colin stepping out for several months to finish his education, and Rivits singer Rachel stepping in to take his place. During this period, the Casualties put together a demo. The following year, the core lineup consisted of Colin, Jorge, Yureesh, and Mark. The band added guitarist Fred when Hank dropped out, and went on to make an appearance on the compilation Benefit for Beer. Soon more changes were in the works, with new guitarist Fred heading off to school. C Squat's Scott temporarily filled Fred's shoes until he returned a short time later. During this period, guitarist Hank came and went a second time. Another guitarist, Steve, also played briefly with the group.

The Casualties stabilized long enough in the fall of 1991 to put together an EP, 40 Ounce Casualty. By the following year, the band was touring frequently and building up a fan base in their hometown of New York City. In 1993, however, more shakeups were in the works. Guitarist Fred and bassist Mark were out, and Jake Kolatis and Mike were in to take their respective places. The following year, the band appeared on another compilation, Pogo Attack, and put together a second EP, Drinking Is Our Way of Life. The four-track EP was never issued but later was incorporated into the band's 1999 release, Early Years: 1990-1995. Stability remained elusive, and drummer Yureesh and singer Colin dropped out. Shawn stepped in to take Yureesh's place. The group put together a third EP, A Fuckin' Way of Life, in 1995, the same year that Rivits drummer Meggers (aka Mark Eggers) took Shawn's place.

Temporarily settled in terms of their lineup, the Casualties traveled to London in 1996 for a performance on the stage of the Holidays in the Sun Festival. The following year, the band put out their first full-length album, For the Punx, and embarked on a tour where it supported the Varukers. Unfortunately, the lineup evolved again the following year, when the Krays' bassist, Jon, took over when Mike dropped out. Jon stayed long enough to help out on the Underground Army album, but jumped ship during the band's supporting tour across Europe in 1998. To take his place, the band recruited Dave Punk Core, who only stayed until 1999. With the addition of ex-Manix bassist Rick Lopez, the group (rounded out by Jorge Herrera, Jake Kolatis, and Meggers for those still following) started another tour. More tours of the U.S. and Europe followed in 2000 and 2001, along with the albums Who's in Control?, Stay Out of Order, and Die Hards, the last marking their debut on Side One Dummy. On the Front Line appeared in February 2004; two years later, the Casualties preceded Under Attack's late August release with a main stage slot on the Vans Warped Tour. All We Have, the band's eighth studio long player, dropped in 2009, followed by the Season of Mist-issued Resistance in 2012, and Chaos Sound in early 2016.

Click Image To Enlarge
Saturday 1 October
Raven Tower Pavilion 07:00 PM All Ages FREE There will be a $5 cover for under 21. RSVP does not guarantee entry. Admission is subject to venue capacity at time of arrival.
New Language
The new band is out of Los Angeles created by Tyler Demorest and Matt Cohen.

The two joined forces with Tony Hajjar of At The Drive-In / Sparta to produce the new music. Intentions of creating an EP quickly turned into a Summer of writing a d recording a handful of songs that are now beginning to surface.

"WAKE UP" is the first song written and released by NEW LANGUAGE, debuting on TripleJ Radio by Richard Kingsmill.

"It's a call to action… a plea to snap out of the current haze of cultural monotony we've all come to expect and many have come to embrace." - Tyler Demorest, Vocals

NEW LANGUAGE made their debut performance in April 2016 to a sold out crowd as direct support to Gone Is Gone (Queens of the Stone Age, Mastodon, At The Drive-In) in Los Angeles, CA and has now embarked as direct support to THE USED on their 15 Year Anniversary Tour across the US.

The band's live lineup is Tyler Demorest (vocals, guitar), Matt Cohen (bass), Sebastien Betley (guitar), and Martin Dovali (drums).

Click Image To Enlarge
Sunday 2 October
White Oak Music Hall Downstairs 07:00 PM All Ages $20.00 ADV   $22.00 DAY OF $24.00 DAY OF BOX OFFICE
St. Lucia, Sofi Tukker
Emotional moments are Grobler's specialty. Under the name St. Lucia, he crafts the kind of high-energy, artful pop that tugs at the heartstrings as it pulls you onto the dance floor, and in four short years, he's amassed a lifetime of highlights: signing with Columbia Records; selling out multiple nights at Terminal 5 in his adopted hometown of NYC; performing at major festivals from Lollapalooza to the main stage at Coachella; touring with stars like Ellie Goulding and Two Door Cinema Club; landing his songs in national campaigns from Victoria's Secret to Taco Bell; producing the debut LP for friends and label-mates HAERTS; and collaborating on remixes for peers like Passion Pit, Charli XCX, and Foster The People.

It's all been remarkable, but it's also only been the prelude to Matter, St. Lucia's second full-length release and most exhilarating collection yet. The record finds a more sophisticated and bold Grobler grappling with themes of getting older, battling with insecurity and self-doubt while balancing maturity and ambition. It's a St. Lucia record though, so even the darkest moments are bristling with infectious vitality and hook-fueled charisma. Writing the songs, however, required Grobler to change up his process from 2013's 'When The Night,' the debut album he built from the ground up playing nearly every instrument himself in his Brooklyn studio.

Though synth-pop has been an easy and reductive label used to categorize St. Lucia, most of the songs on Matter feature as much electric guitar, explosive percussion and complex brass arrangements as synthesizers. Nearly every track on the album contains horns and multi-part vocal arrangements, their sophistication reflective of Grobler's lifetime of music study. But there's nothing academic about a St. Lucia concert. Grobler and his cohorts are first and foremost a live band, with their reputation for dazzling, immersive shows fueling their rapid growth and status as global festival favorites.

Click Image To Enlarge
Sunday 2 October
White Oak Music Hall Upstairs 08:00 PM All Ages $15.00 ADV   $18.00 DAY OF $20.00 DAY OF BOX OFFICE
Gallant, RKCB
The push-and-pull that drives Gallant's music is like a pendulum swinging back and forth between genres and influences. His combination of muscular vocal acrobatics and sonic unpredictability has attracted universal tastemaker praise and a growing fan base. Complex championed the Los Angeles-based singer and songwriter as "The R&B game changer," LA Times claimed, "Precise writing of Frank Ocean, big vocal runs of Sam Smith," and NME predicted, "the voice that will redefine R&B," while Entertainment Weekly, The Fader, Billboard, and more have shown support. Sir Elton John summed it up best saying, "Gallant is gonna be huge." In addition to performing at Coachella and SXSW in 2016, he collaborated live with Seal and Sufjan Stevens and sold out his first two NY and L.A. shows. However, the artist continues questioning, learning, and progressing on his full-length debut, Ology [Mind of a Genius/Warner Bros. Records].

"I was knowingly trying to dig deep," he explains. "I wanted to be more vulnerable and honest. I asked myself, ‘What can I say that's almost too uncomfortable to share?' The process felt like this analytical dissection of myself, but I wasn't going to find any solutions. Ology references this constant pursuit we all experience without any starting point or conclusions."

Gallant has been on this pursuit since junior high. Growing up in Columbia, MD, he began tinkering on his computer and making songs after school inspired by everything from nineties R&B to classic jazz and blues. Rather than write in a journal, the music collated his feelings and emotions. He'd rarely share it with friends though. While attending NYU, he enrolled in summer school, so he could graduate early. Post-graduation and countless hours of meticulous practice later, he was finally ready to share his songs to the world at large.

"I was still approaching music as a means to learn more about myself," he goes on. "I started pulling from more influences, getting more skilled at the computer production-wise, and growing as a writer. When I got out of college, I felt like I had to define myself by a body of work."

His first online release "If It Hurts" would establish him in the blogosphere, while 2014's Zebra EP landed him on Spotify's viral charts and at the top of HypeM. Signing to Mind of a Genius in 2015 and relocating to L.A., he dove into creating what would become Ology with co-producers such as Stint. The first single "Weight In Gold" enjoyed its world premiere on Zane Lowe's Beats 1 Radio show as the introductory entry in the coveted "World's First" segment. In less than six months, it accumulated over 6.5 million Spotify streams.

Tempering an airy atmosphere with chopped-up blues guitars, "Weight In Gold" gives way to an impassioned and infectious croon reminiscent of a gospel transmission from the furthest reaches of outer space.

"I was opening up a little bit more, so I decided, ‘Fuck it. I'll scream on the chorus,'" he admits. "The lyrics fizzled down into my brain. It's one of the most vulnerable pieces I have."On the intoxicating follow-up single "Bourbon," his fiery falsetto takes hold and transfixes. "I wanted to create a hurricane-type storm of vocals," he says. "It's one of my darkest songs, which makes it really special."

Then, there's "Skipping Stones" where Gallant trades vivid and vital verses with Jhené Aiko over a backdrop of horns, heavenly keys, stirring strings, and a jazzy beat produced by composer Adrian Younge.

"We recorded it all to tape," he recalls. "We wanted it to be imperfect. It defines the umbrella on which most of the album falls under: feeling lost and longing for something you can't obtain. Jhené is an amazing person. I've always admired her work, and she killed it."

As Gallant continues on his search, he leaves a message on the path. "If people can hear I'm not doing this to feed any ego or serve someone else, that's all I want," he leaves off. "I'm trying to create a photo album I can look back on to see where I've overcome challenges. I'm using music as a means of self-discovery."

Click Image To Enlarge
Monday 3 October
White Oak Music Hall Upstairs 07:00 PM All Ages $12.00 ADV $13.00 DAY OF BOX OFFICE
Lucy Dacus
Lucy Dacus's No Burden is full of surprises-sharp lyrical observations, playful turns of musical phrase, hooks that'll embed themselves in your frontal lobe for days. But the most surprising thing about this album might be the fact that it's a debut; it has a keen sense of self about it, and it nearly glows from the self-possession held by the woman at its core.

The 21-year-old Dacus grew up in Richmond; she was adopted at a young age, an experience that informed her curious, openhearted songwriting. "When my parents were explaining what adoption was-which was very early on in my childhood-they always said that my birthmother thought I was worthwhile even though she couldn't be my mom," she says. "And so from essentially infancy, I was taught that life was innately worthwhile because a bunch of people had worked together to set me up with one.

"Every other philosophy of mine has been built on that foundation," she continues. "Humans want this experience for each other; there has to be some reason why. I seem to always end up trying to write and understand how we can live the most worthwhile life, and therefore how we hold each other up from getting there."

Dacus started playing around Richmond while in college, opening for local acts and eventually meeting Jacob Blizard, a guitarist who invited her to make a record for a college project of his. No Burden, which originally came out in February on the Richmond label EggHunt Records, opens with the forthright, almost brutally honest "I Don't Wanna Be Funny Anymore," the last song Dacus wrote before the album's day-long recording session at Starstruck Studios in Nashville. Dacus delivers scalpel-sharp observations about resisting pigeonholing over chunky guitars, ticking off ideals of femininity and youth until the track's not-quite-resolution.

These themes extend to the lyrics of songs like "Strange Torpedo," a whirling portrait of a friend whose "bunch of bad habits" who, Dacus sings, has "been falling for so long… [and hasn't] hit anything solid yet." "I've been that friend watching a loved one do what they know is bad for them and not understanding why," says Dacus. The song offers a simple message: "'I love you, why don't you love you? You're the one in your body so you get to choose what to do with it, but if I were you I'd treat me differently.'"

The rest of No Burden, which was produced by Collin Pastore, puts Dacus's voice center stage, allowing the glinting poetry of her lyrics to shine even more brightly. "Trust," which Dacus wrote in late 2013, showcases her alone with her guitar, her faint vibrato floating over strummed chords as she sings of self-redemption. And the diptych "Dream State…" and "…Familiar Place," which revolve around Dacus repeating "Without you, I am surely the last of our kind/ Without you, I am surely the last of my kind," capture disappointment and loss in a jaw-dropping way; the music trembles around her while her voice stays steady, anticipating whatever might come next.

No Burden is a forthright, disarmingly catchy statement. And while it's a sterling debut, it only hints at the potential possessed by this passionate, thoughtful young woman. -Maura Johnston

Click Image To Enlarge
Tuesday 4 October
White Oak Music Hall Downstairs 06:30 PM All Ages $23.50 ADV   $25.00 DAY OF $27.25 DAY OF BOX OFFICE
Foals, Bear Hands
On an unseasonably warm night in March, 2013, within the august, hallowed walls of the Royal Albert Hall in London, something extraordinary happened. Five musicians took to the stage, launched into a song called Inhaler, and blew the roof off. For the 5,000-plus people who were lucky enough to be present that evening, the experience was more like a mass epiphany at a revivalist meeting than a gig. Foals whipped up a frenzy and sent it hurtling towards the audience, who gave it a shake and sent it hurtling right back. Two hours later, we staggered, reeling, out into the night. This was more than music. This was alchemy.

But then, inevitably, came the fear. Could the band ever match this? My advice for the fretters is simple: put on track one - the title track and lead single - of Foals's visceral new album, What Went Down. Put it on anywhere - on your headphones, in the car, in the great wide open, and put it on LOUD. "I buried my heart in the hole in the ground," sings Yannis Philippakis, like a fire-and-brimstone preacher in a Deep South prayer house, over eerie, pitch-shifting organ. "With the lights and the roses and the cowards downtown. They threw me a party, there was no one around. They tried to call my girl but she could not be found." That's when the beat kicks in, a giant Motorik beast of a thing that hurls the song forwards. A lowering, syncopating theme enters the picture, threatening to drag the song down into the depths. And, oh God, here's the chorus. It doesn't just arrive, it explodes. "When I see a man I see a lion," Yannis screams. "When I see a man I see a LIAR." Radiant, roiling, roistering, rabble-rousing: this is music that is at once beautiful and hellish, euphoric and demonic. What, and you were worried Foals couldn't match what they'd created before? Match it? They've fucking left it for dust.

It cannot be the case that one type of music can be more resonant, more significant, than another. Music, from whatever genre, either connects or it doesn't; not because it's chart-pop, or alt-country, or deep house, or art-rock, but because it speaks to us, baffles us, ensnares us. Sometimes, though, a band will ride roughshod over that logic, will create something that takes music beyond the usual narrow considerations of chart placings and boy-meets-girl platitudes, and renders all around it irrelevant, trivial, disposable. All of the truly transformative and era-defining albums have grappled with questions that are a world away from the bland bleatings of homogenised pop. Permanence and impermanence, life and death, solitude, vulnerability, intimacy, passion, rage, humanity - weighty issues that make demands of the people creating that music, and of all those who listen to it, too.

What Went Down confronts these issues head-on. Recorded with James Ford (Arctic Monkeys, Florence + The Machine) in the same Provence village where, 127 years ago, the artist Van Gogh was hospitalised in a psychiatric ward after slicing off his ear, the album sees the band take their songwriting to a new level. Yet it was, says frontman Yannis Philippakis, the easiest to make. "We spent two months in the studio, and that's quick for us. There's a propensity in the band to over-think, and sometimes undo what had been great in the first place, out of boredom or restlessness - or a desire to make something better. But it rarely is. But I think we'd all have got bored of being in the band had we not had that restlessness. I mean, I can't begin to imagine, or predict, what the next record will sound like, but thank god for that. There are so many bands where you just know what their next move will be, because it'll be the same as their last one."

No sooner had Foals rounded off their world tour for the Holy Fire album with an incendiary headlining set at last September's Bestival, than they were back in the studio - and it's that sense of urgency, Yannis says, that gives What Went Down its power. "By the time we got to Bestival, we were playing the best we ever have. I had this image of the band as this 10-legged beast, this ruthless, elegant machine, with everyone pulsing at exactly the same frequency. The five of us were at this level where the shows were still reckless and on fire, but it felt like we'd become this predatory animal, designed to annihilate the spaces we were in. The point is, if we'd had two months to deflate, to re-enter normal life, before going back into the studio, the new record would never have sounded like it does."

Too often in the past, Yannis has been crudely characterised as a tormented, chain-smoking obsessive, as someone not liberated by music but driven half-mad by it - to the point where it's tempting to feel that those doing such pigeonholing would rather musicians and songwriters were opinion-free automatons, trumpeting the light-entertainment party line. Do we seriously want that? Or do we want artists for whom creativity is like mortal combat, who bear the scars of those battles but don't hesitate to re-enter the fray? Yannis is the first to admit that he's a poor advertisement for the serenity that music is supposed to induce. But for him, that's not the point. He's not using music, using songwriting, to cauterise the wounds (wounds that most of us, if we're honest, carry round with us, too). He's using it to explore them, to attempt to understand them.

Writing the title track came about during a period , Yannis says, where he was "thinking a lot about masculinity, but also about being an animal, being violent and primal. When I sing that song I feel like I'm this fevered, skulking, brawling person. But again, there's a vulnerability in there, too, and I think that's got something to do with moving to London. I'd been in Oxford for so long, and I had to recontextualise myself, I'd marked the lampposts in Oxford, I knew my co-ordinates. In London, I thought, ‘I'm one of 10m people you know?' It's about trying to escape yourself, too; trying to tear everything away."

The decision to work with James Ford was an easy one, Yannis says. "The chemistry was just immediately right. He doesn't praise you, he's very British in that respect. I remember, for the first few days in France, I'd be going, ‘Why's he not being more encouraging?' It took me a while to realise that that was a good thing. There were two clear aims this time: a really lean sound, nothing extraneous, nothing too fluffy, trying to get away from some of the more epic tendencies the band have. At the same time, we wanted to explore the more experimental side of the band, and push the extremes out further, in every direction - to dial everything up, to make the heavy stuff even more menacing."

Albatross, a pivotal track on the new album, is certainly that. The lyrics are like daggers, self-lacerating shards of mockery and disgust - you can almost hear Yannis's lip curl as he rages against himself on lines such as "You've got a hundred broken wishbones under your bed / You've got a hungry green-eyed monster that you keep fed", as the clattering house beat and glacial piano send the song galloping towards oblivion. It's shivers-up-the-spine stuff, music that delves into the darkest reaches of your soul and leaves you feeling winded. It's also brave, fearless and shockingly candid. The antithesis of talent-show warbling. Music as passion, fire and confrontation.
By contrast, the album's astonishingly beautiful closing track, A Knife in the Ocean, is like the calm before the storm, but also the stillness and silence after it has passed. A song that addresses the ephemeral, fleeting nature of human existence, and our endearing but deluded attempts to defy that irrevocable reality, it opens with Tibetan bells, and a plainsong-like melody that conjures up a supplicant at prayer. "When I come to walk the line," Yannis sings, "the fire it comes, but I'll be just fine." Yannis likens the narrator to "a young man, saying ‘I'm going out, what I'm going to face will be dangerous, and I may not return.' On one level it's about a sort of personal apocalypse, a personal oblivion, confronting the conveyor-belt nature of life, and becoming more aware of human frailty, and how that interacts with being a fairly confident, bullish individual. But it's also about looking round at a city like London and thinking, ‘How could this ever cease to exist? Something this imposing? This evidence of human endeavour?'"

Again, the question needs to be asked: do we want music that shies away from the complexity of life, from the baggage we all, every one of us, carry, from the fear we all feel, from the rapture and thunderstruck love that somehow coexist with that fear? Or do we, rather, want music that confronts that? Four albums in, Foals continue to walk into the storm. They can't not, say Yannis. "I decided that whatever I wanted to say, I was really going to say it in the lyrics this time; and that, sonically, we'd have the same approach. There are far fewer veils on this record. It's unfettered communication, it's the clearest distillation of me, of all of us. Before, there's always been that gap between the imagination, the romance and fantasy about what we wanted to create, and the actual reality, and that disparity has been difficult. But on this record, we're the closest we've ever been to the vision in our heads. I feel much more at ease in myself, definitely; that things have aligned for me, creatively, where I feel far more confident, and much closer to the goal than I was before. One thing that we really take pride in, really take great enjoyment from, is that, through a series of beautiful accidents, we've got to the position where there's no tethering to any preconceived idea of what we should do. So it feels like we can do anything."

My notes on What Went Down, taken when I first heard the album, look like automatic writing, a scribbled blur that makes me feel breathless if I read it back. On every page, the same words are repeated, always in capitals: SONG! LIVE!!! I am impatient to the point of petulance to see the band play new songs such as Night Swimmers ("Calypso!" "Tom Tom Club" "SONG!"), London Thunder ("Hymn-like, elemental" "WHAT a melody!" "Amazing liftoff into middle 8" "LIVE!!"), Give It All ("Woodpecker staccato guitar" "Vast return of drums") and Birch Tree ("Total bliss-out, borne aloft" "Summer soul, West Coast with the roof down" "Middle 8 massed vocals, handclaps") live. To feel the brute force of the title track ("Fucking HELL. Sonic carnage") slap me in the face. To watch one of the best bands in the bloody world whip up a frenzy and send it hurtling towards me. At which point, I'll give it a shake, and send it hurtling right back. For What Went Down is more than music. What Went Down is alchemy.

Click Image To Enlarge
Tuesday 4 October
White Oak Music Hall Upstairs 07:00 PM All Ages $12.00 ADV $13.00 DAY OF BOX OFFICE
Voodoo Glow Skulls with Special Guests Tartar Control, Always Guilty, Metanoia
In their 24 years of existence, the Voodoo Glow Skulls have an impressive list of achievements. 9 albums, one million records sold, appearances in exotic locations like Brazil and Japan as well as the creation of a record store, record label, recording studio and a music venue attests to the remarkable creativity and energy of the band. Formed in 1988, Voodoo Glow Skulls meshed hardcore punk, traditional ska, tough guitar riffs and the Mexican music of their roots to create the prototype for the West Coast ska-core sound. Unflinchingly honest, their songs often used humor to comment on harsh political realities - from racial inequity to unrest overseas. Singing in both Spanish and English, Voodoo Glow Skulls' bilingual musical tradition has been a hallmark of the band since they began.
The core of the band since the beginning has been the three Casillas brothers, Frank, Eddie and Jorge. With a list of accomplishments that might make some bands ready to slow their pace, the band shows no signs of slowing down. Voodoo Glow Skulls dubbed their sound "California street music" - a perfect description of their high octane mix of rock, punk, ska and hardcore.
Voodoo Glow Skulls 9th studio album "Break the Spell" was released on January 17th on Smelvis Records and is available now!
Current Line Up:
Eddie Casillas-Guitar
Frank Casillas-Vocals
Jorge Casillas-Bass
Vince Sollecito-Drums
Mark Bush-Trumpet
Dan Albert-Trombone

Click Image To Enlarge
Tuesday 4 October
Walter's Downtown 07:00 PM All Ages $15.00 ADV   $20.00 DAY OF $22.00 DAY OF BOX OFFICE
The Felice Brothers, Aaron Lee Tasjan
The Felice Brothers (Simone, Ian, and James) and their long time friends and bandmates Greg Farley and Christmas Clapton, come to us from the Catskill Mountains, where a homegrown sound has been working its way through the bloodlines for generations. Their rambling journey so far has brought them from busking in New York City subway stations, to tours across the world that have included enthusiastically received performances at major music festivals including Bonnaroo, All Points West, Outside Lands, and Langerado.

A defining memory to date might be their appearance at the 2008 Newport Folk Festival. A summer afternoon thunderstorm rolled in and began to douse the land. While it electrified the atmosphere, the rain had the adverse effect of cutting power to The Felice Brother's stage. After many assurances that power would be restored, they were informed it was a lost cause, and that they'd have to make due acoustic. Without hesitation the band jumped down into the crowd and began playing acoustic while stomping around barefoot in the mud that had formed on account of the ongoing downpour. What might have led some to call it a wash and leave was turned into another epic show that drew upon the familiarity and casual ease of the backyard bbq sessions that took place at their dad's porch on Sunday afternoons during their first days as a group. The audience that day, like others before and after, left utterly converted.

Titled with a phrase drawn from the pages of Mark Twain, Yonder Is The Clock is a nod to all of the American ghosts that lend their narrative and characters to the Felice Brothers' forthcoming April 7th release. Their studio was built from the remains of an abandoned chicken coop and it was there over the summer and fall of 2008 that they wrote and recorded this new collection of songs. Presented by Team Love Records, Yonder Is The Clock is teaming with tales of love, death, betrayal, baseball, train stations, phantoms, pandemics, jail cells, rolling rivers and frozen winter nights. This is music that hasn't lost sight of the history of the land from which it came, and that quality alone makes The Felice Brothers the next great American band.

Click Image To Enlarge
Wednesday 5 October
Raven Tower Pavilion 06:00 PM All Ages $16.00 ADV   $18.00 DAY OF $20.00 DAY OF BOX OFFICE
The Summer Set Made For You Tour 2016, William Beckett, Hudson Thames
Pairing their infectious brand of pop rock with catchy driven choruses, The Summer Set are on a mission to win the hearts of audiences worldwide. Led by singer Brian Dales, the band's fourth full-length Stories For Monday delivers 11 of their most well-crafted songs, throwing punch after punch of sun-drenched nostalgia, reckless love, and Dales' most honest lyrics to date. The Phoenix, AZ quintet quickly became a phenomenon through the independent music scene since their formation and have continued to hone their irresistible brand of feel-good pop through major television syncs and new album Legendary (2013). The band have come off an incredible string of success that includes a full summer on the Main Stage of the Vans Warped Tour 2014, winning the 2013 iHeartRadio Rising Star Competition, appearing in Macy's "Back To School" TV, online and radio ad campaign, performing at the iHeartRadio Music Festival in Las Vegas, broadcasted on the CW, as well as TeenNick's Top 10 with Nick Canon. The band also performed the single "Lightning In A Bottle" as part of the 2013 Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade. Led by poignant single "Figure Me Out" and the infectious "Missin' You", new album Stories For Monday is positioned to be The Summer Set's most powerful release to date.

Click Image To Enlarge
Wednesday 5 October
White Oak Music Hall Upstairs 07:00 PM All Ages $15.00 ADV $17.00 DAY OF BOX OFFICE
Skeletonwitch, Iron Reagan, Oathbreaker, Gatecreeper
The drought is over. After years in the wilderness, homegrown heavy metal has finally returned. No longer the domain solely of our European forefathers, metal pure in both delivery and creativity is gaining momentum at breakneck speed in the Western Hemisphere. Leading the charge domestically are Ohio‟s sons of Midwestern darkness SKELETONWITCH, who have emerged as forerunners of this new American sound. The „WITCH‟s mighty, sonic fortress is an amalgamation of classic Bay Area thrash, Scandinavian death/black metal and NWOBHM. Upping the ante from their Prosthetic debut, Beyond the Permafrost, these five gnarly longhairs show no mercy and take no prisoners on their newest long-player, Breathing the Fire, which debuted at #151 on the Billboard Top 200 charts.
To lay this nasty, raging slab to tape, SKELETONWITCH traveled to Seattle and hooked up with legendary producer Jack Endino (Nirvana, Soundgarden, High On Fire). To make things extra filthy, the „WITCH enlisted Scott Hull of grind kings Pig Destroyer to handle the mastering duties. Tracks like "Crushed Beyond Dust" and the leveling album-opener "Submit to the Suffering" are sure to whip even the most jaded metal fan into a psychotic frenzy.
"Breathing the Fire is a burning, fucking beast!" says guitarist Scott Hedrick. "The drums are monstrous; Chance‟s sickening vocals sound inhuman and somehow retain amazing clarity; Evan‟s bass sounds like Steve Harris, Lemmy and D.D. Verni in a blender; and the guitars sound like jousting chainsaws. A lot of people said that on Beyond the Permafrost, we married black and thrash metal. With Breathing the Fire, they banged and had a kid - and that baby‟s a burner!"
SKELETONWITCH‟s vicious live show and fierce blue-collar ethic have helped to establish the band as torchbearers of today‟s metal scene. They were handpicked by Glenn Danzig for his 2008 Blackest of the Black tour, and have since logged countless miles on the road crisscrossing the nation with the likes of Municipal Waste, Job For A Cowboy, Amon Amarth, Dimmu Borgir, 1349 and Cannibal Corpse. In the fall of 2010, they hit the road with Children of Bodom and The Black Dahlia Murder. The band has also made high-profile appearances at several festivals, including the New England Metal and Hardcore Festival in 2008, 2010 and 2011, the 2010 Scion Rock Fest in Atlanta (along with Mastodon, High on Fire, etc.), South By Southwest and Ozzfest.
"White van, black t-shirt: that‟s been my life since we started SKELETONWITCH," adds Hedrick. "We love and live for the road. We‟ll play the enormo-dome or we‟ll play in your fucking closet - we don‟t care as long as we get to play. Being out there on the road and mixing it up with all the metalheads is what it‟s all about. We‟re all one and the same, and if we weren‟t fortunate enough to be on the stage, we‟d be right in front of it banging our heads."


SKELETONWITCH formed in 2003 and self-released their debut full-length, At One With the Shadows, in 2004. In 2006, after several underground tours, the band broke through musically with the self-released EP Worship the Witch (which included a limited, handmade edition by Baroness‟ John Baizley). Worship the Witch peaked label interest, and in 2007, the band signed with Prosthetic Records and released Beyond the Permafrost, which received numerous accolades in the U.S. and overseas and landed on many year-end "Best Of" lists including Revolver, Decibel, and Pitchfork. The album also cracked the top ten of the CMJ Loud Rock Chart.
SKELETONWITCH brings together the old and sacred elements of true heavy metal, melts them down, and forges them into a brand new monolith of riffage. If you know what‟s good for you, you‟ll come out and bang your head when SKELETONWITCH comes to your town. Worship the 'WITCH!

Click Image To Enlarge
Thursday 6 October
White Oak Music Hall Upstairs 08:00 PM All Ages $13.00 ADV   $15.00 DAY OF $17.00 DAY OF BOX OFFICE
mc chris, MC Lars, Mega Ran
mc chris (always spelled in all lower case letters) is rapper from the Libertyville, Illinois, a suburb of Chicago. He was one of the first rappers to focus solely on nerd life, rapping about Star Wars, Harry Potter, ninjas and unrequited love, instead of the usual hip hop fare. He's just as likely to make an appearance at Comicon as he is at SXSW.

mc got his start as an animator on many of the shows you see on Adult Swim. He was writer, actor, songwriter and animator for Sealab 2021, The Brak Show, Space Ghost Coast to Coast and Aqua Teen Hunger Force. He has voiced characters on several Adult Swim pilots such as Welcome to Eltingville, Cheyenne Cinnamon, Your Pretty Face is Going to Hell and Tight Bros. He was also a producer of on air content for over a year before leaving Williams Street to pursue a career in music.

mc has since crossed America countless times touring as a headlining act, as well as opening for bands like Pinback and Reggie and the Full Effect. He's collaborated with Talib Kweli, Andrew WK, Cee-Lo and Childish Gambino. His music has been featured in Kevin Smith's Zak and Miri Make a Porno, Jay and Silent Bob's Super Groovy Cartoon Movie and he has composed several themes for Smith's Smodcast podcast network. mc's song "hoodie ninja" was featured in both a Honda commercial and America's Funniest Home Videos. Other songs have been featured in Comedy Central's Broad City and Fox's So You Think You Can Dance? mc most recently started in the pilot Bunny and Frog for Disney and a national commercial for Fiat.

mc raises money to fight Cystic Fibrosis. Inspired by his nephew who has CF, mc chris and his fans have raised over $150,000 for the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation through eBay sales and donations collected at live shows.

mc kickstarted "the mc chris cartoon" an animated extension of the skit universe featured on his records. Thanks to donations from his fans, he raised $60,000 and produced a six minute pilot presentation with the animation company Titmouse Inc. mc is currently shopping the project.

mc chris lives in Los Angeles with his wife and son.

Click Image To Enlarge
Friday 7 October
Raven Tower Pavilion 07:00 PM All Ages $17.00 ADV   $20.00 DAY OF $22.00 DAY OF BOX OFFICE
Jon McLaughlin, Marc Scibilia, Brad Ray
Whether writing and producing songs, performing his music, or hanging out with his two daughters, Nashville-based singer-songwriter, Jon McLaughlin puts passion into everything he does. McLaughlin has released six albums and over the years, this piano-rock musician has collaborated with fellow artists such as Sara Bareilles, Demi Lovato, and NeedtoBreathe as well as sharing the stage with artists including Kelly Clarkson, Adele, OneRepublic, Bon Jovi, and Duffy. In 2014, a dream came true when Jon even supported the legendary piano man himself, Billy Joel.

Jon has provided songs for television shows, such as Madam Secretary, Chicago Fire and So You Think You Can Dance. In addition to contributing music to major Hollywood films, including Bridge to Terabithia and Georgia Rule, McLaughlin earned an on-screen appearance and performance in the Oscar-nominated Disney film, Enchanted, a d went on to sing "So Close," live at the 80th Academy Awards.

Filled with "infectious and catchy piano-driven melodies" (Eat Sleep Breathe Music), his new album, Like Us has already garnered attention from notable media outlets, such as The Huffington Post, Entertainment Tonight and Perez Hilton, with the latter referring to McLaughlin as "charming as hell with a buttery voice to match." While on a national tour in support of the album this past fall, the devoted family man partnered with charity World Vision, to build safe houses for children in Bangladesh to help them escape human trafficking.

Click Image To Enlarge
Friday 7 October
White Oak Music Hall Downstairs 07:30 PM All Ages $18.00 ADV   $20.00 DAY OF $22.00 DAY OF BOX OFFICE
Oh Wonder, Kevin Garrett
There is a sign pinned to the wall of Oh Wonder's recording studio in south-east London, a pact of sorts, signed by the band's two members, Josephine Vander Gucht and Anthony West, in the winter of 2012. It isn't a checklist or a plan so much as a setting down of shared dreams for their musical careers. "We wrote it to say that we're dependent on one another," explains Josephine. "That there are things we want to achieve, and we can help each other get there."

That Oh Wonder have achieved all of these dreams in the first year since starting the project is testament to their talent and their perseverance, but even they seem a little startled by how much more they have attained: the 100 million streams and now their debut album, a collection of 15 impeccably-crafted songs that explore London and loneliness, love and the need for human relationships.

Josephine was a classically-trained solo performer and Anthony a singer and producer whose lives and careers overlapped for several years - a run of near-encounters and half-conversations at gigs and venues, and vague introductions through musical acquaintances and mutual friends. It was only when they finally sat down in Anthony's former studio in north London with a view to producing an EP of Josephine‘s solo material that they realised their great musical bond. "We found all our favourite bands were the same bands, all our favourite songs were the same songs," says Anthony. "It was a day of saying ‘Oh you should listen to this'. And then the other one saying ‘I know that song. That's one of my favourite songs.'" "It was," adds Josephine "really, really odd. I've never had that. I've never felt that closely aligned with someone, musically speaking, and more widely in terms of how we view the world."

It was Anthony's suggestion that they begin writing together - purely for fun at first, as an exercise in songwriting and collaboration while they pursued their other musical projects. The first song they wrote was called Body Gold and was, Josephine says, "the marker for what the sound of Oh Wonder was: electronic and somewhat R'n'B, which was totally surprising, and totally different to our solo work, but we were really proud of it."

Still, for 18 months they did nothing with it. Anthony moved to London and released an EP as part of a duo, Josephine was busy writing and recording as Layla. "But we thought it was a waste to leave Body Gold unheard," says Anthony. And so they decided to post it on the internet, anonymously.

That day they went to a café in east London, posted the song on SoundCloud and emailed a few of their favourite music blogs about it. "We were in this café," Josephine remembers, "and we were looking at the play-count, and I think it said six plays, and then all of a sudden these blogs started posting the song - really lovely write-ups saying ‘Who the hell are these people? They're about to blow up the internet.'" They sat in the café and watched the play count climb to 100. A few weeks later it had reached 100,000 plays. Just over a year later and they have tens of millions of plays and a string of sold out headline shows across the UK, Europe, Australia and the USA. "It was just really, really bizarre. And odd. And completely accidental," she says. "We didn't tell anyone it was us, we didn't ask people to listen, we didn't tell our friends, it was so far removed from us. But I genuinely think that the reason so many people connected with it was because it was really sincere."

The plan from the start was to release a song a month, for the course of a year. "We approached it as a songwriting project rather than an artist project," continues Anthony. "And so the most important thing of all is the song and we would never release what we consider to be a bad song."

They had already written two other tracks: Shark and All We Do - a track Josephine finds most affecting. "It's about the human propensity to play it safe and not push yourself beyond the parameters of normal life," she says. "It's about just existing and not wondering or being inquisitive. It's about how a lot of people sink into the monotony of everyday life. And how it's a shame, because the world's there for the taking, and you've got to go grab it and have an adventure."

Their own adventure soon gathered pace. They found they could write quickly, finishing the body of a song in 20 minutes or so and spending more time, they say, on the production. "Writing together is a weird magical thing," says Josephine. "More than anybody else in the world I trust Ant. Which makes the writing process totally open, totally vulnerable and non-judgmental, and means you can say all of these things openly in a song."

The things they chose to say all possess a striking tenderness and a tangible passion for life, ranging from exquisite break-up songs Drive, Landslide and The Rain to quiet rallies against materialism, gambling, gentrification and globalization, and, in Lose It, a song that serves as a tribute to a night out they once had in Melbourne, where as the sun came up, Josephine found herself at a party dancing in her underwear to Destiny's Child. "I've never before felt what I felt that night," she says. "I didn't take any drugs, and I wasn't even drunk, there was just something heady in the air. It was the first time I'd ever felt untethered from myself."

Though they vary from piano-led ballads to whip-sharp electronica, what unites all of Oh Wonder's songs is their extraordinary sense of humanity. "We didn't realise it at first, but a lot of our songs are about relationships and support," says Josephine. Anthony points to album opener Livewire, "which is about needing someone to lift you up, someone who can bring you up from your lowest point, bring you back to life, be the heartbeat you need…" and to White Blood, about times in life, in illness or difficulty, when you "really need someone with you", and to Heart Hope, inspired by watching the area around their home in east London rapidly gentrify, and feeling that for all the shiny new buildings, what people really need is other people, "it's saying actually all you need is a heart and a soul and to be connected to yourself and to each other."

"They're songs about humans, and about people being there in your life," says Josephine. "People need people. And that's what this album looks at, from all the different angles: it's about being grateful for the people in your life, for relationships of all sorts."

Perhaps most of all, this album is Anthony and Josephine's tribute to each other, to the partnership they have formed, the places it has taken them and the confidence they have given one another.

Josephine tells a story that perhaps best sums up the depth of the belief they have in one another - the bond, the trust, and the faith they have in their own music: "I used to have lots of jobs," she says. "I worked in Waterstones, and waiting tables, and Ant was the person who told me to give them up. He told me to call up my boss and say "Sorry I can't work at Waterstones anymore, I'm being a musician." He said "we're going to do this. And that was the same day we wrote that sign."

Click Image To Enlarge
Friday 7 October
Warehouse Live The Studio 08:00 PM All Ages $15.00 ADV   $17.00 DAY OF
Russian Circles, Helms Alee
Perhaps the most immediately apparent characteristic of the fifth Russian Circles album, Memorial is its wide range of emotion. Vacillating from somber-yet-soaring melodies on one track to pummeling metal heft on the next, Memorial sounds like an album with split personalities.

Where one song showcases guitarist Mike Sullivan, drummer Dave Turncrantz and bassist/keyboardist Brian Cook's mastery of lush melancholic melody, the next exhibits their most abrasive underground metal leaning sound, with washed-out 16th-note riffs and crushing rhythms. The band's penchant for endless hooks remains a constant, but Memorial embodies their most dramatic ranges in tone.

"We've always tried to balance our metal-influenced sounds with more nuanced, pretty, orchestral elements," Cook says. "But this time, it's far more polarized in that the heavy parts are much more blown out and exaggerated while the pretty moments are far more restrained, delicate, and atmospheric." In the two years since Russian Circles released their landmark fourth album Empros, the Chicago trio toured worldwide nearly incessantly, encountering many heavy acts whose music seemed needlessly complicated. "We set out to make a straightforward, intense, heavy record," Cook explains. "We subconsciously gravitated toward darker and more somber sounds. We wanted to get away from the overtly flashy."

To a degree, the monolithic, juxtaposed moods on Memorial is the band's reaction to the proliferation of iPod culture affecting how bands write music. Today, most musicians are trying to mash together disparate elements with results sounding as unpalatable as cooking a meal blindfolded. Russian Circles wisely and deftly sidestep the trappings of genre amalgamation. "I want to hear a band with a broad palette," Cook says. "But it should find that weird balance with breadth and width. We wanted to make a record with more extreme peaks and valleys. I'm hoping that we can get away with making a schizophrenic record."

Click Image To Enlarge
Friday 7 October
Revention Music Center 08:00 PM All Ages $27.50 ADV $29.50 DAY OF BOX OFFICE
Young The Giant - Home Of The Strange Tour
With the breakout success of their self-titled 2010 debut album and widespread acclaim for their exhilarating live shows, Fueled By Ramen recording group Young The Giant has quickly established itself as one of the most exciting new bands to come out of Southern California in recent memory.

For their highly anticipated second album "MIND OVER MATTER," Young The Giant enlisted Grammy-nominated producer Justin Meldal-Johnsen -- known for his work with such diverse artists as Beck, Nine Inch Nails, Paramore, and M83. Featuring the electrifying lead single "It's About Time," the collection of songs finds the young band challenging themselves both lyrically and musically. "MIND OVER MATTER" follows the band's debut, "YOUNG THE GIANT," which featured singles as "Apartment" and the RIAA gold certified smashes, "My Body" and "Cough Syrup." "My Body" was a top 5 hit at Alternative radio and closed 2011 as the year's fifth most-played song at the format. "Cough Syrup" drew even greater success, peaking at #2 at Alternative, and enjoying crossover chart success at both Hot AC and Triple A radio. "Cough Syrup" remains in regular rotation at radio outlets nationwide and was recently performed on the season premiere of NBC's top-rated show "The Voice."

In addition to its popular success, "YOUNG THE GIANT" also drew reams of critical acclaim from SPIN, The New Yorker, and The Wall Street Journal who hailed the album as "a pop masterpiece with well-crafted songs, surprising arrangements and soaring vocal harmonies." "YOUNG THE GIANT" also received rare applause from British musical icon Morrissey, who enthused, "I could break down with happiness at the new debut CD by Young The Giant. It is the whole thing... It is the perfect tone... and Sameer's voice is unbreakable. If there is any justice in the world (and we all know there isn't) Young The Giant will own most of it... Every three thousand years, a band comes along who restore that precious component of faith."

Young The Giant spent much of 2011 and 2012 traveling the globe, with sold out headline tours, top-billing on mtvU's inaugural "Woodies Tour," and show-stopping appearances at such festivals as Bonnaroo, Austin City Limits, and Lollapalooza. A dynamic and distinctive live act, the band also made a range of high profile TV performances, spanning ABC's Jimmy Kimmel Live!, and NBC's TODAY and The Tonight Show with Jay Leno to 2011's MTV Video Music Awards and their own edition of MTV Unplugged.

Click Image To Enlarge
Friday 7 October
White Oak Music Hall Upstairs 08:00 PM All Ages $18.00 to $55.00 ADV   $20.00 DAY OF $22.00 DAY OF BOX OFFICE
Bob Moses, Weval, Harrison Brome
We gotta keep pushing, gotta keep pushing through. It's gotta mean something to you.

Occupying the fertile ground between organic band land and an all-electronic production project, Bob Moses draw on the two poles to vividly resonate across both. A duo with an individual name, Tom Howie and Jimmy Vallance's musical endeavor plays with this kind of duality all over their debut album Days Gone By.

"We were never happy just making music on guitars," says Tom Howie of the organic-electronic sound of Bob Moses, the Brooklyn-by-way-of-Canada duo he formed with partner Jimmy Vallance. "Our live show combines what a DJ does with a rock band," Vallance adds. "Everything flows together in a continuous mix for the dancefloor, but it's all our own original music, with live vocals and guitar. Then again, we came out of a scene that was trying to change what dance music is - that pushed beyond the expected sonic spectrum."

Initially connecting in high school back in Vancouver, the two went their separate ways - Howie to Boston's Berklee College Of Music, Vallance to the commercial dance charts producing big room floor fillers. After moving to New York City separately only to serendipitously bump into each other in a carpark and discover that they each had studios across the street from each other in Red Hook, the call was made to get together to try and jam something out. "We booked a couple days to write at my studio for fun, and by the end of the week, I told Tom, ‘Come live at my place and let's do this every day'", Vallance recalls. It made sense that the name of their project paid tribute to the city in which it was birthed, and so in homage to Robert Moses, the urban planner behind iconic New York landmarks like Shea Stadium and the Brooklyn-Queens Expressway, Bob Moses was anointed.

Invigorated by the now legendary scene that surrounded the illegal underground warehouse parties that were going down in New York championing a new wave of house and techno crews (including those connected to the Marcy Hotel and Resolute), Howie and Vallance were encouraged to dive in deep following a performance with Francis Harris' Frank & Tony project in 2012, for which they'd been ghostwriting hooks. "We didn't think much of it until we played Marcy with Frank & Tony in 2012," Howie recalls. "Tom sang live to the tracks we'd written, and people went insane! We'd never expected that reaction, which made us think we were on to something," Vallance says. "We woke up the next day thinking ‘We have to become our own act.' We came up with the songs for our first EP, Hands to Hold, and Francis agreed to put it out."

While their introduction to dance music may have come in the genre's traditionally communal setting, it's Days Gone By's potency in solitude that marks it out as a debut album worthy of deeper scrutiny. A sound palette that combines the elegantly icy with an indelibly human touch, its Cologne techno rhythms in the bottom, the elegant otherly distance of Detroit in the middle, and an unmistakably earthly, almost jazzy textures in the top end, anchored by Howie's softly suggestive voice that doesn't dominate, but instead plays out as another instrument in an alluring mix.

Alternating between brooding dancefloor burners and moments of reflective, downbeat repose, Days Gone By is a record that's not in a rush to get to its destination, preferring to subtly, slowly seduce rather than sway and swagger into submission, weaving a rich spectrum of sensation over the course of its twelve tracks.

The opening track Like It Or Not perfectly exemplifies the Bob Moses approach. A stark introduction of piano and voice departs into a propulsive, off-kilter house rhythm, before breaking right back down and riding out on a heady conclusion of vocal harmony, before the first single,Talk, spins a deceptively catchy vocal melody over jacking bass and foreboding ambience. Slinky, sinewy and imperceptibly catchy, Too Much is a grower in the shape of a guitar-led deep house Trojan horse. Tearing Me Up resurrects the oft-overlooked schaffel rhythm to deadly effect, a slow-burning, gyrating epic of tortured love that simmers without ever boiling over, while the title track unfolds in waves of repetition over almost seven hypnotic minutes, a melancholy slice of cathartic release and a worthy album centerpiece. Gentle rhodes chords and a loping heartbeat drum pattern marks Writing On The Wall as one of the record's more vulnerable intermissions, and Here We Are closes out proceedings with a lush, melancholy acoustic guitar-led lament, a touching glance in the rearview.

The balance of man and machine is a delicate dance that Bob Moses have realised with their debut, and Days Gone By is a dazzling exploration of discreet, personal moods that engages and eventually engulfs, tastefully coalescing dance music's giddy rush with more timeless, introspective song craft. Borrowing from both but slaves to neither, as a result the record is equally effective headphone listening as it is deft club euphoria. Days Gone By reveals Bob Moses as masters of their art.
Page: 1 2 3 4
Powered by StubWire.com